April 21st, 2006

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Sean's back at the Sharpe end after 10 years


Sean's back at the Sharpe end after 10 years

As Sharpe returns to our TV screens this weekend,

Chris Bond talks to novelist Bernard Cornwell about his most famous creation.

WITHOUT wishing to incur the wrath of the lifestyle police, it's true to say there were only two things that would keep me out of the pub on an evening during my student days.

One was illness and the other was watching Sharpe – Sunday evenings on ITV, if my memory serves me correctly.Collapse )
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This Hill is alive but not with the sounds of critics


This Hill is alive but not with the sounds of critics

Chris Knight
National Post

Friday, April 21, 2006

Another Friday, another film not screened in time for critics to review it. There have been a record number so far this year, most of them horrors (Stay Alive), comedies (Benchwarmers) and horrible comedies (Larry the Cable Guy: Health Inspector, Date Movie). This week is horror's turn, with a spooky little picture called Silent Hill.Collapse )
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Silent Hill

Silent Hill (15 cert, 125 min)

Silent Hill is a computer-game crossover that will make me go easier on other computer-game crossovers. I've actually played one of the games in Konami's series, in which you wander around the titular ghost town and have the living daylights scared out of you. If it's possible to have the living daylights bored out of you, I'd recommend Christophe Gans's film as the place to try it.

Frighteningly boring: Silent Hill

Radha Mitchell drifts up and down a misty high street looking for her disturbed daughter (Jodelle Ferland), and there's plenty of time to notice that this is the second film in a month (following The Dark) in which Sean Bean plays the dad and we end up crossing over into the netherworld (which here is the normal one, plus drizzle).

"Something really weird is happening," Mitchell keeps saying, as she's lunged at by CGI ghouls, and a giant with a big black pyramid for a hat tries to slice her head off. An ineffably ridiculous Deborah Kara Unger pops up from time to time as a garbling crone going for the cobweb look.

Games, it needs reiterating, shouldn't be films, and films shouldn't be games. This left me pining for the competent dramaturgy of House of Wax.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?xml=/arts/2006/04/21/bfdreamz21.xml
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Sean Bean is back as the dutiful rogue in the British Army.

Sean Bean is back as the dutiful rogue in the British Army.
April 21, 2006

Sharpe's Challenge

By Ray Bennett

Bottom line: Soldiers Sharpe and Harper are back for some old-fashioned adventure.

9-10:30 p.m. Sunday April 23 and Monday April 24
ITV1 U.K.

LONDON -- Bernard Cornwell's terrific creation Richard Sharpe, loyal soldier in the battles of the Duke of Wellington, hasn't been seen in anything new on British television for eight years but he returns in great form Sunday in a new ITV1 two-parter, "Sharpe's Challenge."

Sean Bean is back as the dutiful rogue who rose from the unwashed ranks to become an officer in the British Army through all the fights against the French Emperor Napoleon up to the big one, the Battle of Waterloo.

Picture Palace's Malcolm Craddock and Muir Sutherland have turned 15 of Cornwell's 20-odd novels into TV movies that have proved popular around the world. They have yet to take the U.S. by storm, although that should change this summer when BBC America will broadcast the back catalogue and this new production.Collapse )
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Padma's The Jewel In The Crown


PADMA'S THE JEWEL IN THE CROWN

Padma Lakshmi, successful model, UN ambassador, actress and wife of author Salman Rushdie, has landed her ideal role - filming in her native India with time to indulge her love of jewellery shopping.

The Mail on Sunday (London, England); 4/18/2006
Byline: PAULA KERR

IT doesn't begin well. Padma Lakshmi has overslept after taking an afternoon nap. She sinks into a sofa in the lounge of her Jaipur hotel, pulls back her raven-coloured hair into a ponytail, rearranges her enviably long legs, and explains sleepily, 'I'm sorry, I just woke up. I'm completely dazed.' We are meeting to talk about her role as Madhuvanthi, the beautiful female protagonist in Sharpe's Challenge on ITV1, starring Sean Bean as the swashbuckling 19th-century soldier and adventurer, Richard Sharpe. Shot on location in India, it is a massive investment for ITV (some [pounds sterling]4 million) and Padma's biggest acting job to date. But what follows is a series of curt replies to my questions, at the end of which she apologises again for her sleepiness. And then she has an idea - let's meet up the next morning to go jewellery shopping, and try again.Collapse )